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Article: The middle Miocene duck Chenoanas (Aves, Anatidae): new species, phylogeny and geographical range

Papers in Palaeontology - Volume 4 Part 3 - Cover Image
Publication: Palaeontology
Volume: 4
Part: 3
Publication Date: August 2018
Page(s): 309 326
Author(s): Nikita V. Zelenkov, Thomas A. Stidham, Nicolay V. Martynovich, Natalia V. Volkova, Qiang Li, and Zhuding Qiu
DOI: 10.1002/spp2.1107
Addition Information

How to Cite

ZELENKOV, N.V., STIDHAM, T.A., MARTYNOVICH, N.V., VOLKOVA, N.V., LI, Q., QIU, Z. 2018. The middle Miocene duck Chenoanas (Aves, Anatidae): new species, phylogeny and geographical range . Papers in Palaeontology, 4, 3, 309-326. DOI: /doi/10.1002/spp2.1107

Author Information

  • Nikita V. Zelenkov - Borissiak Paleontological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences Profsoyuznaya 123 117647 Moscow Russia
  • Thomas A. Stidham - Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution & Human Origins of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100044 China
  • Nicolay V. Martynovich - The Museum of the World Ocean 236006 Kaliningrad Russia
  • Natalia V. Volkova - Borissiak Paleontological Institute of Russian Academy of Sciences Profsoyuznaya 123 117647 Moscow Russia
  • Qiang Li - Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution & Human Origins of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100044 China
  • Zhuding Qiu - Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution & Human Origins of the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology Chinese Academy of Sciences Beijing 100044 China

Publication History

  • Issue published online: 03 August 2018
  • Manuscript Accepted: 06 December 2017
  • Manuscript Received: 13 September 2017

Funded By

Chinese Academy of Sciences. Grant Number: XDPB05
Russian Foundation for Basic Research. Grant Number: 17‐04‐01162
National Natural Science Foundation of China. Grant Number: NSFC41472025
Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Grant Number: XDB03020501

Online Version Hosted By

Wiley Online Library
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Abstract

A notable reorganization of the waterfowl communities apparently took place across Eurasia during the middle to early late Miocene, when primitive and extinct anatid taxa (e.g. Mionetta) were replaced by more derived forms, including extant genera. However, little is known about the diversity of Eurasian waterfowl and their palaeobiogeography during this critical interval. In particular, larger ducks of the middle Miocene are represented by poorly known taxa including ‘Anassansaniensis from western and central Europe and Chenoanas deserti from Western Mongolia. We report new geographically widespread specimens referred to Chenoanas from Mongolia, eastern Siberia, and China that include a new species, Chenoanas asiatica sp. nov., and allow for recognition of the European ‘Anassansaniensis as a member of Chenoanas. We describe the oldest remains of Chenoanas sansaniensis from eastern Siberia, which supports a westward dispersal or range expansion of this group of ducks during the Miocene, comparable to the previously established biogeographical affinities of many Eurasian mammals. These data also support a growing body of evidence that avian faunas of Siberia were similar to European ones during the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum. Our data indicate a wide Eurasian distribution (more than 8000 km) and a greater diversity within the genus Chenoanas during the late early to middle Miocene. The phylogenetic analysis of Chenoanas suggests that it may be a primitive member of Anatini, and thus does not belong to the basal radiation of extinct relatives of stiff‐tailed ducks (Oxyura and its relatives). Species of Chenoanas were probably not specialized divers.

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