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Article: A new interpretation and palaeoecological significance of the fossil bee cell cluster Rosellichnus patagonicus (Celliformidae)

Papers in Palaeontology - Volume 3 Part 3 - Cover
Publication: Palaeontology
Volume: 3
Part: 3
Publication Date: August 2017
Page(s): 363 371
Author(s): Laura C. Sarzetti, Jorge F. Genise, Eduardo S. Bellosi, and Liliana F. Cantil
DOI: 10.1002/spp2.1078
Addition Information

How to Cite

SARZETTI, L.C., GENISE, J.F., BELLOSI, E.S., CANTIL, L.F. 2017. A new interpretation and palaeoecological significance of the fossil bee cell cluster Rosellichnus patagonicus (Celliformidae). Papers in Palaeontology, 3, 3, 363-371. DOI: 10.1002/spp2.1078

Author Information

  • Laura C. Sarzetti - CONICET División Icnología Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales ‘Bernardino Rivadavia’ Buenos Aires Argentina (Email: lsarzetti@macn.gov.ar)
  • Jorge F. Genise - CONICET División Icnología Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales ‘Bernardino Rivadavia’ Buenos Aires Argentina
  • Eduardo S. Bellosi - CONICET División Icnología Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales ‘Bernardino Rivadavia’ Buenos Aires Argentina
  • Liliana F. Cantil - CONICET División Icnología Museo Argentino de Ciencias Naturales ‘Bernardino Rivadavia’ Buenos Aires Argentina

Publication History

  • Issue published online: 01 August 2017
  • Manuscript Accepted: 22 February 2017
  • Manuscript Received: 29 September 2016

Funded By

Argentine Agencia Nacional de Promoción Científica y Tecnológica. Grant Numbers: PICT 2012/022, 0326
CONICET. Grant Number: PIP 2013‐58

Online Version Hosted By

Wiley Online Library
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Abstract

The trace fossil Rosellichnus patagonicus preserved in palaeosols is a cluster of vertical bee cells with smooth inner surface and discrete walls. R. patagonicus was originally described from two fragmentary specimens which limited a morphological analysis, the correct interpretation of the producer and palaeoecological inferences. Abundant specimens of R. patagonicus recently collected from several Cenozoic localities of Patagonia, principally from the La Pava Formation at Paso del Sapo, have allowed the recognition of a complete set of morphological characters, among which the curved neck of some cells is particularly significant. Isolated cells in the same outcrops show similar curved necks. Such cells are constructed only by diphaglossinae bees, to which clusters and isolated cells may be attributed. These trace fossils are particularly comparable with extant cells and clusters of Cadeguala albopilosa (Diphaglossinae) which at present nests in forest clearings with grass cover. Accordingly, the andic mollisols from the Miocene La Pava Formation, where R. patagonicus is abundant, formed in warm‐temperate, sub‐humid and seasonal conditions, under grass‐dominated vegetation with subordinate tree coverage.

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