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Article: Late Oligocene caviomorph rodents from Contamana, Peruvian Amazonia

Papers in Palaeontology - Volume 3 Part 1 - Cover
Publication: Palaeontology
Volume: 3
Part: 1
Publication Date: Febuary 2017
Page(s): 69 109
Author(s): Myriam Boivin, Laurent Marivaux, Adriana M. Candela, Maëva J. Orliac, François Pujos, Rodolfo Salas‐Gismondi, Julia V. Tejada‐Lara, and Pierre‐Olivier Antoine
DOI: 10.1002/spp2.1068
Addition Information

How to Cite

BOIVIN, M., MARIVAUX, L., CANDELA, A.M., ORLIAC, M.J., PUJOS, F., SALAS‐GISMONDI, R., TEJADA‐LARA, J.V., ANTOINE, P. 2017. Late Oligocene caviomorph rodents from Contamana, Peruvian Amazonia. Papers in Palaeontology, 3, 1, 69-109. DOI: 10.1002/spp2.1068

Author Information

  • Myriam Boivin - Laboratoire de Paléontologie Institut des Sciences de l'Évolution de Montpellier (ISE‐M, UMR 5554, CNRS/UM/IRD/EPHE) c.c. 064 Université de Montpellier F‐34095 Montpellier Cedex 05 France (Email: myriam.boivin@umontpellier.fr)
  • Laurent Marivaux - Laboratoire de Paléontologie Institut des Sciences de l'Évolution de Montpellier (ISE‐M, UMR 5554, CNRS/UM/IRD/EPHE) c.c. 064 Université de Montpellier F‐34095 Montpellier Cedex 05 France (Email: laurent.marivaux@umontpellier.fr)
  • Adriana M. Candela - División Paleontología Vertebrados Museo de La Plata La Plata Argentina (Email: acandela@fcnym.unlp.edu.ar)
  • Maëva J. Orliac - Laboratoire de Paléontologie Institut des Sciences de l'Évolution de Montpellier (ISE‐M, UMR 5554, CNRS/UM/IRD/EPHE) c.c. 064 Université de Montpellier F‐34095 Montpellier Cedex 05 France (Email: maeva.orliac@umontpellier.fr)
  • François Pujos - Instituto Argentino de Nivología Glaciología y Ciencias Ambientales (IANIGLA) CCT‐CONICET‐Mendoza, Av. Ruiz Leal s/n Mendoza Argentina (Email: fpujos@mendoza-conicet.gob.ar)
  • Rodolfo Salas‐Gismondi - Departamento de Paleontología de Vertebrados Museo de Historia Natural – Universidad Nacional Mayor San Marcos (MUSM) Lima Peru (Email: rsalasgismondi@gmail.com)
  • Julia V. Tejada‐Lara - Departamento de Paleontología de Vertebrados Museo de Historia Natural – Universidad Nacional Mayor San Marcos (MUSM) Lima Peru (Email: julia.tejada@columbia.edu)
  • Julia V. Tejada‐Lara - Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences Columbia University in the City of New York and Division of Paleontology American Museum of Natural History New York NY USA
  • Pierre‐Olivier Antoine - Laboratoire de Paléontologie Institut des Sciences de l'Évolution de Montpellier (ISE‐M, UMR 5554, CNRS/UM/IRD/EPHE) c.c. 064 Université de Montpellier F‐34095 Montpellier Cedex 05 France (Email: pierre-olivier.antoine@umontpellier.fr)

Publication History

  • Manuscript Accepted: 02 October 2016
  • Manuscript Received: 04 May 2016

Funded By

CNRS ‘Eclipse 2’
CNRS ‘Paleo2’
Toulouse University ‘SPAM’ programs
L. S. B. Leakey Foundation
ANR PALASIAFRICA. Grant Number: ANR‐08‐JCJC‐0017, ANR‐ERC
National Geographic Society
‘Investissements d'Avenir’
‘Agence Nationale de la Recherche’. Grant Number: CEBA, ANR‐10‐LABX‐0025‐01
CoopIntEER CNRS/CONICET
ECOS‐SUD/FONCyT international collaboration programs

Online Version Hosted By

Wiley Online Library
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Abstract

The Deseadan South American Land Mammal Age (late Early Oligocene – Late Oligocene) attests to a time of great diversification in the caviomorph rodent fossil record. Nevertheless, Deseadan rodent‐bearing localities in Neotropical lowlands are few and poorly known. Here we describe the rodent assemblages from two Late Oligocene localities, near Contamana, Loreto, Peru. Seven taxa are new to science: Palaeosteiromys amazonensis gen. et sp. nov., Plesiosteiromys newelli gen. et sp. nov., Loretomys minutus gen. et sp. nov., Scleromys praecursor sp. nov, Ucayalimys crassidens gen. et sp. nov., Chambiramys sylvaticus gen. et sp. nov. and Chambiramys shipiborum gen. et sp. nov. These rodent faunas show that caviomorphs were relatively diverse in Peruvian Amazonia during the Late Oligocene, with the co‐occurrence of at least three extant superfamilies: Erethizontoidea, Octodontoidea and Chinchilloidea. Additionally, they mark the earliest known occurrences of Scleromys, of a small erethizontid closely related to Microsteiromys and of an adelphomyine closely reminiscent of Ricardomys (all taxa previously restricted to Miocene localities thus far). They also document a form potentially related to Eosallamys (previously known from around the Eocene–Oligocene transition at Santa Rosa in Peruvian Amazonia). Finally, the geographical range of Adelphomyinae and of Deseadomys is widely expanded to the lower latitudes of South America for the Deseadan interval. The latter elements, in addition to the record of a very primitive species of Scleromys, suggest the absence of palaeogeographical and palaeoenvironmental barriers within the southern cone of South America before the Oligocene–Miocene transition.

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